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Could Seahawks go after Antonio Brown?
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Moore: Why Seahawks should consider bringing in Antonio Brown

The Raiders released Antonio Brown, and Jim Moore thinks the Seahawks should talk to him. (AP)

Before I get into why I think the Seahawks should at least take a look-see with Antonio Brown after he was cut by the Raiders, can I mention something to anyone who thinks I’m just proposing this and writing this post to get clicks and page views?

You’re right!

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That’s what I’ve always done, even before the Internet was even invented. When you’re writing columns and stories, you’re hoping that people will find them interesting enough to read them. When I worked at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, I tried to write columns or tackle topics that no one else was writing about. Maybe I fell short with some of those columns but I just figured, what the heck, I’ll give you something you’re not going to get anywhere else.

And in some cases, in my newspaper days anyway, what I came up with might have been better suited for a garbage can. I’m not sure why I felt compelled to include that disclaimer today, but I just thought that a post encouraging the Seahawks to explore the possibility of adding Brown to the roster would be viewed as so ridiculous that the only reason I’d be proposing such a thing was to light up cyberspace.

Anyone like me who thinks the Seahawks should bring Brown in for a visit isn’t all-in with bringing him on board. I mean, at first this was the horse before the cart or the cart before the horse or however that saying goes – Brown was still a member of the Raiders on Friday, though reports existed that higher-ups in the Oakland organization would like to get rid of him on the basis of him being more trouble than he’s worth.

And then on Saturday, the reports became true.

If you’ve kept up with the goings-on with this petulant child over the last month, you don’t want any part of him on your favorite team. He had issues toward the end of his career in Pittsburgh, and if a player has problems with Mike Tomlin, he’d probably have problems with any other coach too. Then he unloads his baggage in Oakland. So much for those who believe in “a change of scenery.” Brown has been an absolute three-ring circus with frostbitten feet, issues with his helmet and missing walk-throughs and practices.

Why would the Seahawks want to take that on? Two reasons:

• Brown has 837 receptions for 11,207 yards and 84 TDs in his career. In the last six years, he has averaged 115 receptions and 1,524 yards per season. Adding a future Hall of Famer to your team increases your chances of winning a Super Bowl – on the field anyway; I understand how he could be disruptive in the locker room too.

• Outside of Tyler Lockett, the Seahawks don’t have a receiver they can count on. I fully get that David Moore, Jaron Brown, Malik Turner and the three rookies might be more than fine in time, but going into the season I have doubts about the entire group, even if the Seahawks have a run-first offense. Adding Brown would be an instant upgrade, just like Jadeveon Clowney to the defensive line.

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For every reason you give me as to why it would be a complete disaster, I’d nod my head and say you’re probably right. But there’s a chance you could be wrong too. Pete Carroll got the most out of Marshawn Lynch, and you might counter by saying that Beast Mode wasn’t the piece of work that Brown appears to be, but I’d argue that the Seahawks could have a different set of rules for Brown like they had for their marquee running back.

I honestly don’t think the Raiders should have issued more than $50,000 in fines to Brown, which really made him mad, to the point that he posted the letter from GM Mike Mayock on social media. I would have called him in and said, “Look, Antonio, here’s what we could have fined you, but we’re going to let all of these training camp and preseason shenanigans go and start fresh.” Then I would have extended my hand and hoped he shook it and then really hoped he could be as productive for the Raiders as he was for the Steelers.

Does he deserve preferential treatment? Probably not, but I would have given it to him anyway to try to get the most out of him and keep him happy. Plus Carroll is the kind of coach that could make it work with Brown.

You can easily shake your head and say, “Hey, Jim, what about Percy Harvin? That didn’t work out so well.”

And I’d say “Point well-taken, but Harvin did help the Seahawks win a Super Bowl.”

Again, all I’m saying now that Brown has been cut by Oakland is get him on a float plane and take him to the VMAC. Drop him off at the dock and roll out the red carpet. Find out what makes him tick.

I admit, I can see a scenario where Brown exhibits bad body language when he’s open and Russell Wilson doesn’t see him, or if he doesn’t get enough throws in his direction because the Seahawks are running the ball so much.

But flip it around: What if Brown and Lockett turn into one of the best 1-2 receiving combinations in the league? And let’s be honest, as good as Lockett was last year, we don’t know if he will turn into a capable No. 1 receiver.

Hey, John Schneider, give it a shot. And if he truly is more trouble than he’s worth, send him on his way. But find out for yourself. Brown’s numbers warrant a visit.

Follow Jim Moore on Twitter.

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