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Seahawks RB Carlos Hyde
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Texans reporter: Carlos Hyde will ‘fit right in’ with the Seahawks’ offense

Texans reporter John McClain says the Seahawks made a great signing in getting RB Carlos Hyde. (Getty)

The Seahawks made their latest move of the 2020 offseason by reportedly adding veteran running back Carlos Hyde to the team on a one-year deal worth up to $4 million.

Clayton: What the Carlos Hyde signing means for the Seahawks’ roster

Hyde, 29, played his first four seasons with the San Francisco 49ers before brief stints with the Cleveland Browns, Jacksonville Jaguars, Kansas City Chiefs and Houston Texans, who he played for last year.

Hyde enjoyed a career year with Houston, rushing for 1,070 yards. It was the first time he ran for over 1,000 yards in his six-year career. Now, he enters the Seahawks’ running back room as the presumed No. 2 option behind starter Chris Carson as 2018 first-round pick Rashaad Penny recovers from an ACL tear. Penny is expected to miss some time as he gets healthy, and before the Hyde deal, Seattle had just 2019 sixth-round pick Travis Homer and 2020 fourth-round pick DeeJay Dallas behind Carson on the depth chart.

So what are the Seahawks getting out with Hyde, a former rival with the 49ers? Someone who got to see him up close and personal last season was John McClain, who covers the Texans for the Houston Chronicle. He joined 710 ESPN Seattle’s Bob, Dave and Moore on Friday after the report came out that Hyde was signing with Seattle, and he told the show that Seahawks fans should be excited.

“How often do you get a 1,000-yard back to be a backup?” he said.

That 1,000-yard season was a bit of a surprise. Hyde was with the Chiefs during the 2019 offseason and joined the Texans after the team’s starting back Lamar Miller tore his ACL in a preseason contest. Houston sent tackle Martinas Rankin to Kansas City for Hyde, who quickly assumed the No. 1 back role.

After some success with the 49ers in his first four years, Hyde had a down year in 2018, rushing for just over 500 yards for the Browns and Jaguars.

“I didn’t think much of (the trade) at the time … (but) he just fit (Houston head coach) Bill O’Brien’s offense,” McClain said. “He fit in their running game, which has been eighth or ninth the last few years and he rushed for a career-high 1,070 yards, had six touchdowns, tied for the second most of his career.”

With known receiving back Duke Johnson Jr. in the mix, Hyde wasn’t tasked with catching the ball too much, but early in his career with the 49ers, he showed he was more than capable of doing just that. Because of this, Hyde left the field a decent amount so Johnson could play, but he still had a great statistical season.

“I think if Carlos had been a full-time back, he might have gained 1,200 or 1,300 yards, but he spent a lot of time getting breathers while they got Duke Johnson in on passing situations,” McClain said.

So if Hyde was such a good fit and had great success with the Texans, why didn’t he re-sign? It wasn’t for lack of effort on the team’s part, McClain said.

“(Houston) tried to sign him to a new deal. They offered him at the combine two years for $10 million, the same deal Mark Ingram got from Baltimore, he turned it down and they moved on,” he said.

Houston wound up trading for former All-Pro running back David Johnson. The Texans sent star receiver DeAndre Hopkins to Arizona for Johnson and draft picks. Johnson has battled injuries, but was at one time among the best dual-threat backs in the game. McClain said O’Brien has been “enamored” with Johnson for a while, which made it even less likely Hyde would return.

So, no need to worry, Seahawks fans. It had nothing to do with character issues.

“Carlos is a good guy, a good interview, always cooperative, worked hard, had some long runs, averaged 4.4 yards a carry – I think that’s his most since 2015 or 2016,” McClain said. “Pete Carroll’s got to be really happy with this deal and John Schneider, of course, to get a guy like him to come in in a backup role.”

After a successful season like he had in 2019, how will Hyde handle being in a backup role? McClain said that shouldn’t be a worry.

“Carlos is not going to make any waves,” he said. “He’ll do whatever role he’s brought in to play and you hope ideally Carson stays healthy and Hyde doesn’t play much. But, there’s a good chance he will because the Seahawks love to run the ball. He’ll fit right in. It’s just a terrific addition, especially this time of the offseason.”

The Seahawks love tough, powerful running backs, as evidenced with Carson and Marshawn Lynch. McClain says Hyde fits that mold.

“Carlos runs between the tackles, he can bounce outside. He had several long runs last year. He’s really tough, he breaks some tackles, he can get (yards after carry), and he’s not going to rock the boat,” McClain said. “… When it comes to running, he is a north-south runner.”

You can listen to McClain’s full interview with Bob, Dave and Moore at this link or in the player below.

Follow 710 ESPN Seattle’s Bob, Dave and Moore on Twitter.

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