Title IX: Icons warn of complacency amid law’s success


              This photo provided by ESPN shows Carol Stiff on the ESPN basketball court in Bristol, Conn., Jan. 24, 2020. Some of the giants of women’s basketball say if not for Title IX, doors would not have been open for them to blaze trails to Hall of Fame careers on and off the court, but sound complacency alarms when it comes to  the future of the law.  Stiff, a basketball player/coach turned TV executive, called Title IX priceless.(Melissa Rawlins/ESPN Images via AP)
            
              This photo provided by ESPN shows Carol Stiff on the ESPN basketball court in Bristol, Conn., Jan. 24, 2020. Some of the giants of women’s basketball say if not for Title IX, doors would not have been open for them to blaze trails to Hall of Fame careers on and off the court, but sound complacency alarms when it comes to  the future of the law.  Stiff, a basketball player/coach turned TV executive, called Title IX priceless.(Melissa Rawlins/ESPN Images via AP)
            
              This photo provided by ESPN shows Carol Stiff on the ESPN basketball court in Bristol, Conn., Jan. 24, 2020. Some of the giants of women’s basketball say if not for Title IX, doors would not have been open for them to blaze trails to Hall of Fame careers on and off the court, but sound complacency alarms when it comes to  the future of the law.  Stiff, a basketball player/coach turned TV executive, called Title IX priceless.(Melissa Rawlins/ESPN Images via AP)
            
              This photo provided by ESPN shows Carol Stiff on the ESPN basketball court in Bristol, Conn., Jan. 24, 2020. Some of the giants of women’s basketball say if not for Title IX, doors would not have been open for them to blaze trails to Hall of Fame careers on and off the court, but sound complacency alarms when it comes to  the future of the law.  Stiff, a basketball player/coach turned TV executive, called Title IX priceless.(Melissa Rawlins/ESPN Images via AP)
            
              This photo provided by ESPN shows Carol Stiff on the ESPN basketball court in Bristol, Conn., Jan. 24, 2020. Some of the giants of women’s basketball say if not for Title IX, doors would not have been open for them to blaze trails to Hall of Fame careers on and off the court, but sound complacency alarms when it comes to  the future of the law.  Stiff, a basketball player/coach turned TV executive, called Title IX priceless.(Melissa Rawlins/ESPN Images via AP)
            
              Marsha Sharp poses at the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame in Knoxville, Tenn., Saturday, June 11, 2022. Sharp says Title IX is the most impactful legislation of the 20th century. (AP Photo/Teresa Walker)
            
              Debbie Ryan poses at the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame in Knoxville, Tenn., Saturday, June 11, 2022. Marsha Sharp, Ann Meyers Drysdale, Debbie Ryan and others all worked their way through the nascent days of Title IX to the heights of women’s basketball. (AP Photo/Teresa Walker)
            
              FILE - In this Sunday, March 5, 2017 photo, Debbie Antonelli, center, a women's college basketball analyst for ESPN, talks with play-by-play announcer Beth Mowins, right, before the start of the women's basketball game between Duke and Notre Dame at the NCAA college basketball game in the championship of the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament at the HTC Center in Conway, S.C., Sunday, March 5, 2017. Some of the giants of women’s basketball say if not for Title IX, doors would not have been open for them to blaze trails to Hall of Fame careers on and off the court, but sound complacency alarms when it comes to future of the law. (AP Photo/Mic Smith, File)
            
              FILE  - Texas Tech head coach Marsha Sharp waves the cut net, left, and Texas Tech's Sheryl Swoopes leaps with joy, right, after Texas Tech defeated Ohio State 84-82 in the finals of the NCAA Division 1 Women's Basketball Championship, Sunday, April 4, 1993, in Atlanta, Ga. The woman who coached Sheryl Swoopes and Texas Tech to the 1993 national championship and a handful of other Hall of Famers said in a discussion with The Associated Press the work of Title IX isn’t finished after 50 years. (AP Photo/File)
            
              FILE - Virginia women's basketball coach Debbie Ryan is carried off the court by her players following their 73-55 victory over Florida State in Charlottesville, Va., Sunday, Feb. 21, 1999. The win was Ryan's 500th career victory at Virginia. Marsha Sharp, Ann Meyers Drysdale, Debbie Ryan and others all worked their way through the nascent days of Title IX to the heights of women’s basketball. (Landon Nordeman/The Daily Progress via AP, File)
Title IX: Icons warn of complacency amid law’s success