It’s not just Peng. China is cracking down on MeToo movement


              FILE - A man pulls a sign reading "stand together" away from a supporter of Zhou Xiaoxuan, a former intern at China's state broadcaster CCTV, outside a courthouse in Beijing on Sept. 14, 2021. Zhou, who accused well-known state TV host Zhu Jun of groping her when she was an intern and was once praised for her courage in speaking up, faced a campaign of harassment and can no longer post on her public-facing accounts. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
            
              FILE - Zhou Xiaoxuan, left, a former intern at China's state broadcaster CCTV, reacts as she arrives to attend a court session at a courthouse in Beijing, Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021. Zhou, who accused well-known state TV host Zhu Jun of groping her when she was an intern and was once praised for her courage in speaking up, faced a campaign of harassment and can no longer post on her public-facing accounts. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
            
              In this photo released by #FreeXueBing, Wang Jianbing is seen in a photo taken in Lushan in southeastern China's Jiangxi province, in June 2017. Wang who helped women report sexual harassment, has been detained since September. In China, He is just one of several people, activists and accusers alike, who have been hustled out of view, charged with crimes or trolled and silenced online for speaking out about the harassment, violence and discrimination women face every day. (#FreeXueBing via AP)
            
              In this photo released by #FreeXueBing, Huang Xueqin holds up a #METOO sign for a photo in Singapore on Sept. 2017. Huang, who publicly supported a woman when she accused a professor of sexual assault, was arrested in September. In China, Huang is just one of several people, activists and accusers alike, who have been hustled out of view, charged with crimes or trolled and silenced online for speaking out about the harassment, violence and discrimination women face every day. (#FreeXueBing via AP)
            
              Chinese tennis player Peng Shuai reacts during a tennis match in Beijing, China on Oct. 6, 2009. When Peng disappeared from public view this month after accusing a senior Chinese politician of sexual assault, it caused an international uproar. But back in China, Peng is just one of several people, activists and accusers alike, who have been hustled out of view, charged with crimes or trolled and silenced online for speaking out about the harassment, violence and discrimination women face every day. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
            
              Chinese tennis player Peng Shuai reacts during her women's singles match at the China Open tennis tournament in Beijing on Oct. 5, 2016. When Peng disappeared from public view this month after accusing a senior Chinese politician of sexual assault, it caused an international uproar. But back in China, Peng is just one of several people, activists and accusers alike, who have been hustled out of view, charged with crimes or trolled and silenced online for speaking out about the harassment, violence and discrimination women face every day. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
It’s not just Peng. China is cracking down on MeToo movement